, Education
Taking attractive tourism photographs using your smartphone
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Hello friends working in the tourism sector. Today we are going to share with you some simple tips on how to take attractive tourism photographs with your smartphones. As young people who are passionate about working in the tourism sector, we will present seven photography tips that are really important for us to apply to promote our tourism businesses.

Organisations: USAID’s Tourism For All Project

Authors:

2021, Report
ATKOMA 2021 MID-YEAR REPORT
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Despite the difficulties of the year, ATKOMA is pleased to report that the organization has earned $500 in revenue over 2021 so far through the provision of guided tours and other services. This funding goes directly into supporting our management and marketing of tourism on the island. With the continued support of the USAID Tourism for All Project, ATKOMA continues to focus on ensuring the long-term sustainability of the organization. Through training new tour guides, implementing the Ataúro Visitor Contribution Fee, and encouraging staff to operate on a commission-based model, ATKOMA has generated over $500 from guest fees and tours, helping us on our way to becoming a more sustainable organization.

Organisations: Atauro Tourism

Authors:

2021, Report
2020 ECONOMIC IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON MSMEs and Timor-Leste’s Tourism Sector
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Over the course of 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic had an unprecedented global impact, with the death toll surpassing more than one million by the end of the year. Many regions of the world continue to report rising infection numbers, and this is even the case in countries where infection numbers and deaths were declining. Also, the global recession, as well as local containment measures have had a serious impact on domestic economies.

Organisations: The Asia Foundation

Authors:

2021, Report
Where to next? Community-based tourism in hidden Timor-Leste
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Photo : RAEOA

This photo essay is designed to showcase the community-based approach to tourism development on untouched Oé-Cusse in Timor-Leste. This approach is seen as essential in ensuring that tourism develops in an equitable and sustainable manner, and it meaningfully contributes income to the national and local economies, create jobs, facilitate business creation, improve regional economic imbalances, and protects and enhances the natural and cultural environment. The essay will showcase the tourism product of Oé-Cusse and will also feature some of the entrepreneurs that have benefitted from the community-based tourism development programme, that is being executed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), in partnership with the Special Administrative Region (SAR) of Oé-Cusse Ambeno.

Organisations: United Nations Development Programme

Authors:

2021, Report
CLIMATE CHANGE AND TOURISM IN TIMOR-LESTE: THE TIME TO ACT IS NOW
A CALL FOR ACTION TO RESPOND TO THE CLIMATE CHANGE CHALLENGE FACING TIMOR-LESTE TOURISM |

Photo c. Wayne Lovell 

Prior to the global COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, tourism was growing steadily across the Southeast Asia region (ASEAN) and the world. Undoubtedly, COVID-19 will affect the volume and profitability of the sector in the short term. The silver lining of this crisis is that the industry has an opportunity to ‘build back better’ and establish a more sustainable modus operandi. 

Given tourism’s important role as a creator of jobs, booster of economies and contributor to the fight against global poverty; and in the face of the projected increase in travelers in coming years, there exists a real need for the sector to urgently act to adopt policies which will ensure that the sector is developed responsibly and sustainably, using the ‘quadruple bottom line’ approach of environmental, social, economic and climate responsiveness. This paper will consider all of these sustainability elements, but specifically focus on how to respond to impending climate change challenge.

2021, Report
For Equality And The Economy
Exploring The Gender Dimensions Of Timor-Leste’s Tourism Sector |

Tourism has the potential to be an important sector to drive economic growth, create jobs, and promote innovation for more sustainable development. Globally, the tourism industry employs more women than men around the world1 , and women account for 60% of employees in Accommodation and Food Services in Timor-Leste. This offers the potential for tourism investments to contribute to closing Timor-Leste’s gender gap in employment and to provide better opportunities for women entrepreneurs and women’s leadership in the industry. In 2010 and 2019, the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) conducted global studies on trends for women in tourism, in collaboration with UN Women, GIZ, the World Bank and Amadeus. The reports found that women represent the majority of the workforce, yet are over-represented in service and clerical level jobs, while representing an estimated 25% at the decision-making levels2 . Women make up a higher proportion of self-employed workers across sectors, but in tourism, this percentage varies across countries, highlighting factors that may contribute or limit women’s entrepreneurship in tourism. Furthermore, women perform significant amounts of unpaid work as part of family tourism businesses. Despite these drawbacks, sustainable tourism has been shown to provide significant opportunities for women’s advancement through formal and informal employment and enterprise development.

Organisations: UN Women

Authors:

2021, Report
ATAÚRO ISLAND: Sustainable Management Plan
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Ataúro Island is Timor-Leste’s largest island and has been recognized by the Government of Timor- Leste (GoTL) as a critical area for marine and terrestrial biodiversity. The island hosts a population of more than 11,000 people, distributed across five villages (suco), with livelihoods dominated by a reliance on natural resources and ecosystem services (for agriculture, raising livestock and fishing). In 2019, in response to an increasing number of tourists drawn to visit the island for its stunning landscape and exceptional natural beauty, an “Ataúro Island Sustainable Tourism Strategy” was produced with support from the USAID Tourism For All Project. To complement this tourism strategy, the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF) identified the need for a Sustainable Management Plan (SMP) for the area, to support and guide the sustainable development of the island, and the communities that depend upon its resources, over the coming five years (2021-2025).

2020, Report
The Asia Foundation publishes report on the outlook for aviation and the tourism industry in Timor-Leste, in light of the COVID-19 crisis
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Situated on the southeastern periphery of Southeast Asia and endowed with unspoiled and exquisite natural attractions, Timor-Leste is a magnet for adventuresome tourists. Leisure travelers injected roughly 23.2 million much-needed dollars into the country’s economy in 2019, and success in capturing a larger share of Southeast Asia’s robust tourism market would make a significant contribution to the nation’s development.
Tourism is relatively labor intensive, and with the right mix of products, services, and supporting infrastructure it could bring widespread economic benefits and create jobs for a burgeoning youth population. The National Tourism Policy has a stated goal of 200,000 tourist visits per year by 2030, which would energize the petroleum-dependent economy, but the harsh reality is that costly airfares, poor connectivity, and inadequate airports have kept this goal out of reach.

With the emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic, aviation operations have now been reduced to relief flights to repatriate citizens, emergency medical flights, and deliveries of urgently needed medical supplies. The resulting financial impact throughout the aviation industry has been severe.

Healthy airlines are particularly dependent on reliable cash flow. The International Civil Aviation Organization estimates that the world’s airlines have lost 213 to 257 billion dollars in income since the beginning of the crisis. The general picture is that some airlines have already gone out of business, while others are being restructured or just holding on by a thread. Staff have been laid off, fleets have been pruned, aircraft orders have been cancelled, and less profitable routes are being eliminated.

The airlines that emerge from the global crisis will be smaller and will be focused on survival in a weak market environment, and this, of course, includes operators that directly or indirectly serve Timor-Leste. Timor-Leste is a small market on the periphery of the networks of foreign airlines, and if it is to win a place when air service is restored, it must show operators an attractive value proposition that fits with their scaled-back plans.

A forthcoming analysis by The Asia Foundation, Covid-19 and the Alignment of Timor-Leste’s Aviation and Tourism Strategies, argues that Timor-Leste must seek bilateral or regional travel agreements with like-minded countries that have achieved similar success in controlling the virus and have the capability to manage future outbreaks. With just 30 recorded cases, Timor-Leste is among the most successful countries in dealing with the pandemic, positioning it to offer itself as a partner in a “travel bubble.” Australia, for example, is a low-risk country that accounted for almost 48 percent of inbound travelers to Timor-Leste in 2019. The business communities in Australia and New Zealand have been working with airlines and aviation authorities to reopen travel between the two countries as part of a “Pacific travel bubble” that could be extended to other Pacific island nations. The Cook Islands and Fiji have been monitoring the progress of this Pacific travel bubble, and Timor-Leste would do well to start making preparations for such an arrangement. (Click on this link to read complete article:
https://asiafoundation.org/2020/10/28/a-flight-path-to-recovery-for-tourism-in-timor-leste/

Click on this link to read the report in full: https://asiafoundation.org/publication/covid-19-and-the-alignment-of-timor-lestes-aviation-and-tourism-strategies/ )

(Source: The Asia Foundation’s Gobie Rajalingam with Paul Hooper)

Organisations: The Asia Foundation

Authors: The Asia Foundation’s Gobie Rajalingam with Paul Hooper